NONFICTION AUTHORS IN YOUR CLASSROOM

Resources You Can Use

Many experts have come up with eloquent ideas about introducing children to nonfiction and its value in their lives. Look for articles, studies and books tailored to your own interests in the lists below.

Articles You Can Use

A growing collection of articles about using nonfiction with students in classrooms and in libraries. If the title is self-explanatory, we just supply the necessary link. Otherwise, we include a synopsis or a quotation from the article so you can see if you’re interested in reading it.

There’s a Sea-Change Coming to Education:  In May of 2012, Vicki Cobb interviewed Dr. Myra Zarnowski for the I.N.K. blog about the effect of the Common Core State Standards on the use of nonfiction in the classroom.  This post went viral with more than 6,000 page views.

Literacy-in-Content-Areas
From this wiki: “This is what reading instruction in the 21st Century needs to address, and we CAN NOT wait until our students are in middle and high school, knee deep in content to address this. There are immediate and effective things we can be doing at every grade level to prepare students for this challenge.”

Nonfiction Reading in the Intermediate Grades
“Students who report reading a greater variety of texts perform better on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a standardized test.”

Nonfiction & Reference Resources for Children

The Importance of Non Fiction Text

Some Characteristics of Memorable Expository Writing: Effects of Revisions by Writers with Different Backgrounds
by Michael E. Graves, Wayne H. Slater, Duane Roen, Teresa Redd-Boyd, Ann H. Duin, David W. Furniss and Patricia Hazeltine. Published by: National Council of Teachers of English. Research in the Teaching of English, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Oct., 1988), pp. 242-265. (article consists of 24 pages). Available via JStor.

Reading Nonfiction for Fun
We do not want to develop students who read nonfiction just for function, or for school success, but students who read nonfiction for enjoyment, to be fascinated, to discover.

Formula for Failure: Reading levels and readability formulas do not create lifelong readers
by Betty Carter
To become lifelong readers, children must have access to books. They must also have some help selecting them. Librarians call that help readers’ advisory, and it’s an art

The Future of Reading. A New Assignment: Pick Books You Like
by Motoko Rich
This article in the New York Times focuses on fiction, but you don’t have to!

Nonfiction in the Classroom Library: A literacy necessity
by T.A. Young and B. Moss
This article also talks about how to set up a full classroom library from A to Z.

A Quick Guide to Selecting Great Informational Books for Young Children
By Kathy E. Stephens

The Case for Informational Text
by Nell K. Duke
Younger students need to expand their repertoire and build literacy skills with informational text. This article advocates starting the process early.

Using Nonfiction in Your Read Aloud
Tips from the blog A Year of Reading. Two Teachers who Read. A Lot

Self-Selected Reading in the Balanced Literacy
by Leigh Daley
An interesting PowerPoint that complements the previous read-aloud blog entry

Filling the Great Void: Why We Should Bring Nonfiction into the Early-Grade Classroom
by Nell K. Duke, V. Susan Bennett-Armistead, and Ebony M. Roberts

Using Non-Fiction to Motivate Reluctant Readers
by J.G. Scott

Top Ten Reasons Nonfiction is Perfect for Reluctant Readers!
by Sharon Wright Mitchell

What’s the Big Idea? Passionate Nonfiction Challenges Teens to Think
By Tanya Lee Stone

To get this file, Google the following url and press on the link…
pdfs.voya.com/VO/YA2/VOYA200902AuthorTalk.pdf

Reasons for Using and Teaching Nonfiction
by K. Bucher and M. Lee Manning
Young adult nonfiction is often ignored in schools. This article argues that YA nonfiction needs to be part of the curriculum and recreational reading.

Books You Can Use

Books to help you creatively use nonfiction with children

Encountering Children’s Books: An Arts Approach
by Jane M. Gangi

Info-kids: How to Use Nonfiction to Turn Reluctant Readers into Enthusiastic Learners
by Ron Jobe & Mary Dayton Sakari

Using Nonfiction Trade Books in the Elementary Classroom: From Ants to Zeppelins
by Evelyn B. Freeman and Diane Goetz Person

Nonfiction Mentor Texts: Teaching Informational Writing Through Children’s Literature, K-8
by Lynne R. Dorfman and Rose Cappelli

Gotcha Good! Nonfiction Books to Get Kids Excited about Reading
by Kathleen A. Baxter and Marcia Agness Kochel